Hollywood to Eliminate Ocean Outfall by 2025 with Construction of Two New Deep Injection Wells
Members of the Hollywood Commission and city leaders participated in a groundbreaking ceremony for the digging of two deep injection wells that handle sewage from Hollywood and surrounding cities. The injection wells will take about two years to complete and cost about $40 million. They will have two liners. The wells will handle treated sewage that had been pumped into the ocean. Once these wells are completed, the city will begin work on a $60 million pumping station that will work with the wells.
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Members of the Hollywood Commission and city leaders got together for a groundbreaking ceremony last month for two deep injection wells at the Southern Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant. Construction is now taking place and it will take about two years to complete.

Hollywood to Eliminate Ocean Outfall by 2025 with Construction of Two New Deep Injection Wells
Commissioners Kevin Biederman and Caryl Shuham stand next to a tidal valve that was on display at the ground breaking for a deep water injection well. Hollywood is purchasing six of the valves and the Florida Department of Transportation is purchasing 13 of them. The goal is reduce flooding on AIA and streets close to the ocean. This has become a larger problem with annual king tides.

Since the 1970s, millions of gallons of excess treated sewage are dumped into the Atlantic ocean 1 to 3 miles offshore every day in South Florida.

The sewage is disinfected by water treatment plants, but according to the Department of Environmental Protection, it contains high concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus.

In 2008, federal and state lawmakers passed regulations to end the use of the pipes facilitating the transfer of human waste into the ocean. Since then, flows have been reduced by nearly 40% and treatment plants are on track to end ocean outfall by the 2025 deadline.

“This is important for keeping the ocean clean. We want to be good stewards of the environment,” said Mayor Josh Levy.

The wells will be about 3,000 feet deep and cost about $40 million to construct. They’ll feature a double lining; the interior lining will be fiberglass and the outer lining, steel. They are being built so the city can comply with federal and state regulations that require the ocean outfall to be eliminated by 2025.

The wells will handle treated effluent that is now being discharged through the ocean outfall off Hollywood Beach. This water will be extensively treated and used to water grass areas. The wells also will handle treated effluent from nearby cities including Pembroke Pines, Miramar, Hallandale Beach and Dania Beach.

“This is a big day for Hollywood. We had been using ocean outfall for the treated effluent and now we will soon be able to inject it deep into the ground which will be better for the ocean and the environment,” said Commissioner Caryl Shuham. “This is a huge investment for the city but it’s something we need to do.”

Once the two wells have been completed, a pumping station will be designed and built to pump the effluent into the injection wells. The station will cost $60 million to build and construction will take about two years.   

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David Volz
David Volz has been a reporter for Hollywood Gazette since 2011 and has worked for numerous community news publications throughout South Florida over the past two decades including the South Florida Sun-Sentinel, Miami Herald and South Florida Business Journal. He is a Professor in the Business department at Broward College and the editor of the Coral Springs Connection, an online community news website. He covers city government, schools, sports events, cultural activities, faith groups and workplaces.

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